Twitter Tag

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If you’re a marketer saddled with promoting a dull brand using social media, how do you compete with sexy brands such as Lady Gaga and Coca-Cola? Give your brand the rock-star treatment. Even if you’re not in a sexy industry, you can treat it as such. I wrote an award-winning book on quilting, but you’re never going to see me on “American Idol” or “America’s Got Talent.” No one wants to watch me at my sewing machine creating quilts, no matter how amazing they are. Unless you’re a quilter, too. Quilters are interested, and they will watch. But how did I make my content sexier? I produced a music video of 12 quilted table runners I designed over a year and set it to music my son arranged on GarageBand. I gave the audience a behind-the-scenes glimpse of my creative process, from original drawings, color palettes and design journals to a tour of finished quilts. How can you do something similar for your industry? Give it the rock-star treatment. Think music video, VIP pass, backstage access, T-shirt and memorabilia. Make your brand fun, place it on stage and rock on. Even if your product isn’t as glamorous as rock music, television or the big screen, treat it as such. Give your audience special treatment, and you’ll see traffic and sales increase. Be memorable. Let your personality and that of your staff shine through, so your brand is approachable and personable. Southwest Airlines flight attendant David Holmes raps the normal snoozer of the flight-safety speech. Passengers not only pay attention but also

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It’s easy to get distracted by trivial social media arguments. Social media experts spend a lot of time hashing out old fights about the best tools and tactics for the same reasons some people  can spend hours looking at new faucets or cabinet doors. The less important something is, the more fun it is to kibitz about, because the responsibility that comes with being wrong is relatively minor. It doesn’t really matter what your kitchen looks like; so long as it is functional, durable and built on a stable foundation, you can have those cabinet arguments worry-free.

Key Answers to Key questions;

The trouble is, too many people have the cabinet door conversation without ever talking about the foundation. The way I see it, there are only seven questions in all of social media that really matter. Of course, they’re pretty big questions. But if you can answer them to the fullest, then the answers to many of your minor questions fall into place.
  1. Who am I speaking to? And don’t just say “potential customers.” That’s a dodge and you know it. Get specific. Think about who you’re trying to reach in terms of both demographics (age, location, income, etc.)  and psychographics (what to they believe? what do they like? what are they worried about?). And remember that the latter often tells you more than the former. Unless you really know, on an intimate level, who are you’re speaking to, everything else you’re doing is essentially guesswork, because audience knowledge informs your answer to every one of the remaining questions.
  2. What do they want from me online? The temptation is often to focus on what you want from your customers — and we’ll get to that — but you’re setting yourself up for disaster if you focus on yourself first. Because before anyone is going to do what you want, you have to give them a reason to care about you first. All businesses, nonprofits and institutions exist to serve a function. You do something that people want or need — or

The rise of social media and the growing urgency of transparency made it inevitable for Delta Air Lines to create its own customer service Twitter handle, according to Allison Ausband, the vice president of reservation sales and customer care, who spoke at last week’s Realtime NY 11 conference. “We didn’t have an option but to jump in and participate,” Ausband said. @DeltaAssist was a means to tap into the real-time conversations already happening on Twitter, and thus a way to craft real-time responses. Stuck in a bathroom without toilet paper? Had a flight inexplicably canceled? A tweet to @DeltaAssist would be there to get your problem solved, Ausband said. The Twitter handle was launched in May 2010 with four customer service representatives and would eventually grow to 12 full-time dedicated agents, boasting more than 60,000 response tweets. So how exactly did Ausband build @DeltaAssist to where it is today?

Failure used to be easier to swallow. Back before “fail” was an interjection, before failure had  blogs and whales and other memes attached to it, before you had to worry about schadenfreude propelling your misstep through all of social media — there was a time when a person could screw up fiercely and still take comfort in the fact that most people weren’t going to notice. Even marketers and media types could rest a little easier. If you put out something terrible, most people would ignore it. And even if people did notice, at least your mistake wouldn’t be remembered for long. Now it seems your sins can live on forever, amplified by the echo chamber of the Internet. Ask Rebecca Black if you don’t believe me. Failure in the age of social media is polarizing. Should we become bland and timid, paralyzed by worry and wearing white flannel trousers? Or should we be bold, knowing that if we put a toe out of line, a cry will go up from some dark corner of the Web, the fail hashtag hoisted like a pirate flag, and we’ll be eaten alive by trolls. “ ’Fail’ is the scarlet letter of social media,” David Griner told an audience at a recent BlogWorld & New Media Expo panel. Griner, director of digital content for Luckie & Co., along with Meshin Community Director Dave Peck, explored a variety of recent social media public relations disasters during their presentation. But rather than being frightened by these mishaps, Griner and Peck said, the

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The current environment for advertising and marketing is rapidly shifting. No longer are companies able to slide by with the basic strategies implemented in the past. With new digital developments changing on a continuous basis, being nimble and adaptable to these new forms of communication will be critical to getting the message effectively to consumers and shoppers alike. Already, we have seen huge changes: * From traditional media to multiple forms of communication * From mass to niche media, centered around specific target audiences * From a manufacturer-dominated market to a retailer-dominated, shopper centric market. * From general-focus advertising and marketing to data-based marketing * From limited Internet access to 24/7 Internet availability and access to goods and services The booming culture of social media is also creating countless opportunities for

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Using Wikipedia as a source for an academic paper will still get most people into hot water, yet a growing number of people are turning to even more dubious sites to verify facts for information about their health. A survey of nearly 23,000 Americans, released last month by the National Research Corporation, says that 20% use social media sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, to help make health care decisions, with one in four saying the information found there was “likely” or “very likely” to affect their course of action. Perhaps more telling was that 32% said they had a “very high” trust in social media — only 7.5% of respondents rated their trust level as “very low.” These are not the young or poor making these decisions, either. The survey found

This post is by Erik Deckers, blogger, speaker and co-owner of Professional Blog Service in Indianapolis. Deckers is the co-author of “Branding Yourself: Using Social Media to Invent or Reinvent Yourself,” and helped write “Twitter Marketing for Dummies.” You can’t be a SmartBrief on Social Media reader without knowing that measuring and analyzing your company’s online efforts are important. But what about your personal branding? Knowing whether you’re effectively promoting yourself is also important. This is the type of article that invariably mentions Klout, but I’m willing to bet that most SmartBrief readers are also Klout users, so I won’t bother with it. Instead, here are five other tools you can use to see what kind of impact you’re making with your personal branding. Twitalyzer is a Twitter influence-measurement tool that looks at