Television Tag

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]New scheme of estimation advertising effectiveness[/caption]
In my introductory ad classes, students review two ad articles each quarter. And from the very first class I taught in January of 2001, an overwhelming number of reviews have extolled the glory of highly targeted advertising on the web. These articles described a virtual eden – where advertising’s power is increased because ad dollars are spent only on communication with those who care. Just imagine, they say, targeting by interest, by their browsing history, by online purchase history, by selection of keywords in the past 10 years, and perhaps even by the genetic make-up of the consumer’s children Ten years later, how is Eden? The answer is decidedly “mixed”. First, response rates to web advertising are horrible. I was reading

Aspect Ratio
Image by schani via Flickr
Wayne Friedman noted in a recent article in MediaPost that advertisers have been slow to embrace HD for their TV ads. And that got me thinking. I love HD programming – gorgeous, beautiful, watchable. And, good for many sports because they tend to operate horizontally. But there’s nothing about HD that makes messages more powerful for advertising. I’m sure that aficionado’s would argue with me – claim that pixel densities deliver more information, etc, etc. What I’ve found first hand is that’s meaningless. There’s some value in layering more things on-screen — as a DRTV practitioner we can use more type more to emphasize points so details are clear. But our results weren’t suffering before and the measurable impact of these advantages is negligible – probably so small it’s not detectable. So HD doesn’t help us make messages clearer. There is, of course, an “anti-positive”. If a high tech company (for example) chose NOT to create their ads in HD, it would

Paying people to hold signs is one of the olde...
Image via Wikipedia
In the late 1990′s, the tech industry hype machine went into over-drive telling us that the web would replace retail and become the biggest sales channel for every product on earth. Of course, it didn’t happen. Today, brick & mortar retail dominates purchases – and does so while using the web as one of many communication options and as a small, but important, sales channel. The hype machine's  take on advertising? The same hype machine is now leaping at social media, viral campaigns, and online video as the voodoo that will rescue the web from a minority role in marketing. (How else do you, bring all those grand advertising dollars to the web-guru's and their VC’s who backed the hype machine?) Once again, are these broad claims going to be bogus? Or is the theory