social media strategy Tag

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Infographic on how Social Media are being used...[/caption]
It’s easy to get distracted by trivial social media arguments. Social media experts spend a lot of time hashing out old fights about the best tools and tactics for the same reasons some people  can spend hours looking at new faucets or cabinet doors. The less important something is, the more fun it is to kibitz about, because the responsibility that comes with being wrong is relatively minor. It doesn’t really matter what your kitchen looks like; so long as it is functional, durable and built on a stable foundation, you can have those cabinet arguments worry-free.

Key Answers to Key questions;

The trouble is, too many people have the cabinet door conversation without ever talking about the foundation. The way I see it, there are only seven questions in all of social media that really matter. Of course, they’re pretty big questions. But if you can answer them to the fullest, then the answers to many of your minor questions fall into place.
  1. Who am I speaking to? And don’t just say “potential customers.” That’s a dodge and you know it. Get specific. Think about who you’re trying to reach in terms of both demographics (age, location, income, etc.)  and psychographics (what to they believe? what do they like? what are they worried about?). And remember that the latter often tells you more than the former. Unless you really know, on an intimate level, who are you’re speaking to, everything else you’re doing is essentially guesswork, because audience knowledge informs your answer to every one of the remaining questions.
  2. What do they want from me online? The temptation is often to focus on what you want from your customers — and we’ll get to that — but you’re setting yourself up for disaster if you focus on yourself first. Because before anyone is going to do what you want, you have to give them a reason to care about you first. All businesses, nonprofits and institutions exist to serve a function. You do something that people want or need — or

In early May, Genevieve Mazzeo, manager of public relations and social media at ConAgra Foods, spoke with SmartBrief’s Jesse Stanchak at BlogWell D.C. presented by SocialMedia.org. Mazzeo spoke about how ConAgra, the maker of brands such as Orville Redenbacher, Healthy Choice and Slim Jim, uses social media to build relationships with its various consumers.
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="177" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Healthy Choice Logo[/caption]
  (Full disclosure: SocialMedia.org CEO Andy Sernovitz regularly contributes to this blog and serves as the editor at large for SmartBrief on Social Media.) With more than 50 consumer-facing brands, ConAgra’s social media strategy has to be approached in a specific, purposeful way that meets the needs of each individual consumer. What works to attract a base of Slim Jim fans may not necessarily translate to Healthy Choice buyers, Mazzeo said. Some aspects of ConAgra’s strategy include:
  • Shape content that’s specific to the audience in question. Mazzeo said ConAgra looks to the community to see what’s important to them. By understanding what exactly