social media Tag

Is social media driving tech accessories purchases? The answer, at this point seems to be “yes and no,’” according to Chris Ely, manager, Industry Analysis Market Research for the Consumer Electronics (CE) Association, who outlined the results of a new study during the “Tech Accessories in...

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="240" caption="Image by ralphpaglia via Flickr"]Social Media Marketing[/caption]
SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: Are your company’s social media marketing efforts centrally run?
  • Yes — one division handles social media outreach for the whole company 63.16%
  • No — different divisions handle their own social media outreach 33.83%
  • Not applicable — my company outsources its social media or doesn’t use it for marketing 3.01%
Having one division handle all social media outreach has some obvious benefits: It’s easier to maintain a consistent tone, it avoids too-many-cooks-in-the-kitchen confusion and it allows for specialization. The social media mavens can handle the tweeting

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Infographic on how Social Media are being used...[/caption]
It’s easy to get distracted by trivial social media arguments. Social media experts spend a lot of time hashing out old fights about the best tools and tactics for the same reasons some people  can spend hours looking at new faucets or cabinet doors. The less important something is, the more fun it is to kibitz about, because the responsibility that comes with being wrong is relatively minor. It doesn’t really matter what your kitchen looks like; so long as it is functional, durable and built on a stable foundation, you can have those cabinet arguments worry-free.

Key Answers to Key questions;

The trouble is, too many people have the cabinet door conversation without ever talking about the foundation. The way I see it, there are only seven questions in all of social media that really matter. Of course, they’re pretty big questions. But if you can answer them to the fullest, then the answers to many of your minor questions fall into place.
  1. Who am I speaking to? And don’t just say “potential customers.” That’s a dodge and you know it. Get specific. Think about who you’re trying to reach in terms of both demographics (age, location, income, etc.)  and psychographics (what to they believe? what do they like? what are they worried about?). And remember that the latter often tells you more than the former. Unless you really know, on an intimate level, who are you’re speaking to, everything else you’re doing is essentially guesswork, because audience knowledge informs your answer to every one of the remaining questions.
  2. What do they want from me online? The temptation is often to focus on what you want from your customers — and we’ll get to that — but you’re setting yourself up for disaster if you focus on yourself first. Because before anyone is going to do what you want, you have to give them a reason to care about you first. All businesses, nonprofits and institutions exist to serve a function. You do something that people want or need — or

The rise of social media and the growing urgency of transparency made it inevitable for Delta Air Lines to create its own customer service Twitter handle, according to Allison Ausband, the vice president of reservation sales and customer care, who spoke at last week’s Realtime NY 11 conference. “We didn’t have an option but to jump in and participate,” Ausband said. @DeltaAssist was a means to tap into the real-time conversations already happening on Twitter, and thus a way to craft real-time responses. Stuck in a bathroom without toilet paper? Had a flight inexplicably canceled? A tweet to @DeltaAssist would be there to get your problem solved, Ausband said. The Twitter handle was launched in May 2010 with four customer service representatives and would eventually grow to 12 full-time dedicated agents, boasting more than 60,000 response tweets. So how exactly did Ausband build @DeltaAssist to where it is today?

“Mobile is the glue” that binds a person’s online life to their real-world activities, argued Tim Hayden, chief marketing officer and co-founder of 44Doors, at a recent BlogWorld and New Media Expo session. Your customers are on the go, and your marketing needs to reflect that reality. But before a business can take advantage of the power of mobile, it needs to optimize its marketing efforts to reach customers on the move, Hayden said. Having an integrated mobile strategy allows customers to easily share brand experiences, lets companies tailor content and gives both sides a way to keep conversations alive following real-world interactions, he argued. Here are some of ways Hayden suggested businesses work to integrate mobile into their marketing strategy:
  • Know that simple is best. Everyone knows that social content and Web content are two different animals — and that distinction goes double

Failure used to be easier to swallow. Back before “fail” was an interjection, before failure had  blogs and whales and other memes attached to it, before you had to worry about schadenfreude propelling your misstep through all of social media — there was a time when a person could screw up fiercely and still take comfort in the fact that most people weren’t going to notice. Even marketers and media types could rest a little easier. If you put out something terrible, most people would ignore it. And even if people did notice, at least your mistake wouldn’t be remembered for long. Now it seems your sins can live on forever, amplified by the echo chamber of the Internet. Ask Rebecca Black if you don’t believe me. Failure in the age of social media is polarizing. Should we become bland and timid, paralyzed by worry and wearing white flannel trousers? Or should we be bold, knowing that if we put a toe out of line, a cry will go up from some dark corner of the Web, the fail hashtag hoisted like a pirate flag, and we’ll be eaten alive by trolls. “ ’Fail’ is the scarlet letter of social media,” David Griner told an audience at a recent BlogWorld & New Media Expo panel. Griner, director of digital content for Luckie & Co., along with Meshin Community Director Dave Peck, explored a variety of recent social media public relations disasters during their presentation. But rather than being frightened by these mishaps, Griner and Peck said, the