Shopper Tag

Brand has become the marketing religion of our time and takes on outsized importance in every decision. And that leads to a bunch of lists – each claiming to reveal “the” absolutes of brand building. The following makes no claim about summarizing absolutes. But the more lists I see, the more I love the far more humble and practical sense of brands found among this bakers dozen. And, the more I think they reveal important things that enthusiastic brand enthusiasts seem to have forgotten:
1. Brands build through YEARS of consistent efforts.
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="184" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Pepsi logo (2003-2008). Pepsi Wild Cherry and ...[/caption]
2. No, really. Brands build far slower than anyone wants to think. 3. Building a brand requires not only years, but consistent execution throughout that time. 4. Convincing consumers of a product’s unique value creates brand far more quickly than does lifestyle communication. 5. There are many ways your business can leverage advertising to drive profitability other than “Brand Building”. 6. There are many flavors and types of advertising – all will build brand. That means so-called “brand advertising” may be exactly the wrong way to build your brand. 7. Most brand theorists seem to love exotic and abstract

End-user confusion about drills and drivers is rampant – although the model in this stock photo looks more bored than confused.

Consumer Packaged Goods, What's in a name... Tool makers have created a wilderness of product, category and project names that stand in the way of revenue and market share growth. And no category is more confused than drills and drivers. At the Oregon State Fair recently I ran into some impact drivers from a major brand. You know impact drivers – those great compact tools that use small bursts of torque to deliver turning power around the screw, bolt or nut. “Impact driver” is a strong label for the category of tools because they are used by pro and DIY alike primarily to drive screws and self-tapping hex headed screws (e.g. those used for steel studs). Impact drivers are also used, but less often, to drive lag bolts, remove small stuck bolts, and in a few other driving situations. In other words, from both the pro and DIY end user point of view, they are an evolution of the drill/driver. But at the fair, the boxes were labeled “impact wrench”. Huh? An impact wrench? An impact wrench is a big tool used on cars, trucks, and in factories that delivers 2500 to 7000 in-lbs of torque and is used for the heaviest duty work on cars and trucks. It also exclusively drives sockets and is used on heavy bolts. But the tool in that package was an impact driver – a tool that delivers small bursts of usually 500 to 1300 in-lbs of torque – torque that is light enough to drive screws or hex head screws without breaking them. How can we expect consumers to buy products without consistent categories and names?

This executive summary of the leading-edge 2010 Lower-Income Shopper Report reviews topline results of a cross-demographic, cross-channel, and cross-category analysis with meaningful implications and recommended action steps for those serious about building loyalty with these shoppers. This forward-looking, action-oriented analysis focuses on understanding recessionary...

THE 2010 LOWER-INCOME SHOPPER Effectively Serving Diverse Micro-Segments With widely varying household compositions, cultural backgrounds, shopping behaviors and attitudes, lower-income shoppers are one of the most misunderstood consumer groups today. Many retailers and manufacturers are taking a one-size-fits-all approach to reaching these shoppers, but with a $...

THE 2010 LOWER-INCOME SHOPPER Effectively Serving Diverse Micro-Segments With widely varying household compositions, cultural backgrounds, shopping behaviors and attitudes, lower-income shoppers are one of the most misunderstood consumer groups today. Many retailers and manufacturers are taking a one-size-fits-all approach to reaching these shoppers, but with a...

Posted by Jenny Liu, Industry Marketing Manager, CPGFor decades, a marketer's control over consumer communication was generally straightforward - they dictated the times, places and delivery channels to passive consumers via offline media vehicles. The internet changed that completely, turning the act of consuming into...