Marketing and Advertising Tag

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="160" caption="Image via CrunchBase"]Image representing Steve Jobs as depicted in C...[/caption]
Have you heard the “Jobs Excuse”? When someone introduces a bad idea with “well Steve Jobs says” or “…just like Apple…”. It’s an old name dropping game that hopes to make even horrid ideas sound good. In the world of market research, we hear it most often through one popular quote from Mr. Jobs: “It’s really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” (BusinessWeek, May 1998) The Good. You have to read this quote carefully because what it says is:
- Focus groups aren’t good places to design products. - Only you know what’s possible thru technology - People can’t project ahead to tell you what to build.
He is absolutely right. Far too often, focus groups are asked to answer things consumer participants don’t know and can’t imagine. It’s an exceptionally poor use of research. In advertising, this type or research often asks consumers to decide the colors used in ads or to project what a finished ad might look like based on storyboards or sketches (it’s hard enough for experts to do that – much less consumers). In the extreme, it can even lead to

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SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: Are your company’s social media marketing efforts centrally run?
  • Yes — one division handles social media outreach for the whole company 63.16%
  • No — different divisions handle their own social media outreach 33.83%
  • Not applicable — my company outsources its social media or doesn’t use it for marketing 3.01%
Having one division handle all social media outreach has some obvious benefits: It’s easier to maintain a consistent tone, it avoids too-many-cooks-in-the-kitchen confusion and it allows for specialization. The social media mavens can handle the tweeting

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="239" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Different customer loyality cards (airlines, c...[/caption]
When considering customer experience, the best model is that of an hourglass, not a funnel.  In a webinar hosted by Crowd Factory, Altimeter Group’s Jeremiah Owyang cited Joseph Jaffe’s book “Flip the Funnel,” which posits that many companies spend all their time and energy on trying to lure customers to the point of purchase — and then stop investing in those customers once the transaction has been made. Owyang said an hourglass model, which places value on customers both before and after the purchase, can help grow a company’s customer base by gaining customer loyalty and promoting customer advocacy. “Individual efforts result in an incomplete customer experience,” Owyang said, referring to a diagram that shows a seven-level customer life cycle. Some of his key points for each phase:
  • Use paid media to fuel awareness. If a pre-existing online community or social site can suit your needs, don’t waste time coming up with a new one.
  • Foster an environment for customer consideration. Many consumers swear

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I once sat in a meeting discussing a highly successful TV campaign. Underlying the discussion there’s this funny unspoken question from the brand side of the house: “How can it be good branding if it sold so well?” The truth is that product is your best way to build brand. But this has been lost by the billion dollar brand consultancies and amidst the plethora of marketing PhD dissertations – with collusion from creative teams who learn the hard way that their best opportunity to get the NEXT ad job is to ignore product in THIS one. Consider the brand ecosystem chart Forrester tweeted today. (Link here.) I challenge you to find product in this brand activity chart. Oh, yes. It’s there…somewhere…amidst all the complexity. It took me a while to find it. But the product seems to be hidden

In early May, Genevieve Mazzeo, manager of public relations and social media at ConAgra Foods, spoke with SmartBrief’s Jesse Stanchak at BlogWell D.C. presented by SocialMedia.org. Mazzeo spoke about how ConAgra, the maker of brands such as Orville Redenbacher, Healthy Choice and Slim Jim, uses social media to build relationships with its various consumers.
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="177" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Healthy Choice Logo[/caption]
  (Full disclosure: SocialMedia.org CEO Andy Sernovitz regularly contributes to this blog and serves as the editor at large for SmartBrief on Social Media.) With more than 50 consumer-facing brands, ConAgra’s social media strategy has to be approached in a specific, purposeful way that meets the needs of each individual consumer. What works to attract a base of Slim Jim fans may not necessarily translate to Healthy Choice buyers, Mazzeo said. Some aspects of ConAgra’s strategy include:
  • Shape content that’s specific to the audience in question. Mazzeo said ConAgra looks to the community to see what’s important to them. By understanding what exactly

Failure used to be easier to swallow. Back before “fail” was an interjection, before failure had  blogs and whales and other memes attached to it, before you had to worry about schadenfreude propelling your misstep through all of social media — there was a time when a person could screw up fiercely and still take comfort in the fact that most people weren’t going to notice. Even marketers and media types could rest a little easier. If you put out something terrible, most people would ignore it. And even if people did notice, at least your mistake wouldn’t be remembered for long. Now it seems your sins can live on forever, amplified by the echo chamber of the Internet. Ask Rebecca Black if you don’t believe me. Failure in the age of social media is polarizing. Should we become bland and timid, paralyzed by worry and wearing white flannel trousers? Or should we be bold, knowing that if we put a toe out of line, a cry will go up from some dark corner of the Web, the fail hashtag hoisted like a pirate flag, and we’ll be eaten alive by trolls. “ ’Fail’ is the scarlet letter of social media,” David Griner told an audience at a recent BlogWorld & New Media Expo panel. Griner, director of digital content for Luckie & Co., along with Meshin Community Director Dave Peck, explored a variety of recent social media public relations disasters during their presentation. But rather than being frightened by these mishaps, Griner and Peck said, the

This post was written by Mirna Bard, a social media consultant, speaker, author and instructor of social media at the University of California at Irvine. SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: How would you compare the costs of social media marketing and traditional marketing channels, relative to their returns?
  • Traditional marketing is more expensive than social media marketing – 43.48%
  • It is difficult to compare the two – 41.74%
  • Social media marketing is more expensive than traditional marketing channels – 12.17%
  • They cost about the same – 2.61%
A couple of weeks ago, I was in a meeting with several executives who were debating

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The current environment for advertising and marketing is rapidly shifting. No longer are companies able to slide by with the basic strategies implemented in the past. With new digital developments changing on a continuous basis, being nimble and adaptable to these new forms of communication will be critical to getting the message effectively to consumers and shoppers alike. Already, we have seen huge changes: * From traditional media to multiple forms of communication * From mass to niche media, centered around specific target audiences * From a manufacturer-dominated market to a retailer-dominated, shopper centric market. * From general-focus advertising and marketing to data-based marketing * From limited Internet access to 24/7 Internet availability and access to goods and services The booming culture of social media is also creating countless opportunities for