IPad Tag

Tablets are for fun, while laptops are for work, both play a role in consumer packaged goods.


Tablets have quickly emerged as a distinctconsumer_packaged_goods_laptopconsumer_packaged_goods_ipad third digital screen in consumers lives that fill the gap between desktops and smartphones. But there are still many open questions about exactly how consumers are using them. We explored tablet search trends earlier this year, but wanted to dig deeper and answer key questions such as: What are the contrasts between tablet use, laptop use, and smartphone use and how are consumers engaging across these devices? What are the most common activities (playing games, searching, reading, etc.) that tablets are used for? What ads are most relevant and useful based on how people are using the devices?                                 

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="153" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Behold the iPad in All Its Glory.[/caption]

Tablets Will Be Key To Marketing

  With more than 165 million tablets expected to ship over the next two years, tablets are becoming a popular device with engaged, tech-savvy consumers. Given this explosive growth, tablets need to be a part of your marketing strategy. So Google is now making it easy for you to target tablet devices. We’re pleased to announce that we’re developing new targeting options to help you better connect with this audience. To give you greater control over your AdWords ads, we’re changing the way you can target tablet devices.

Networks & Devices

In the next couple of weeks, the “Networks and Devices” section of you r Settings tab within your AdWords account will include a new targeting option titled “Tablets with full browsers.” While you’ve been able to specifically target Apple iPad devices in the past, the new capability will enable you to easily target your ads to the entire tablet device category. In addition, you'll be able to select more precisely the types of devices and operating systems on which your AdWords ads will show. For example, to display

Paying people to hold signs is one of the olde...
Image via Wikipedia
In the late 1990′s, the tech industry hype machine went into over-drive telling us that the web would replace retail and become the biggest sales channel for every product on earth. Of course, it didn’t happen. Today, brick & mortar retail dominates purchases – and does so while using the web as one of many communication options and as a small, but important, sales channel. The hype machine's  take on advertising? The same hype machine is now leaping at social media, viral campaigns, and online video as the voodoo that will rescue the web from a minority role in marketing. (How else do you, bring all those grand advertising dollars to the web-guru's and their VC’s who backed the hype machine?) Once again, are these broad claims going to be bogus? Or is the theory