Internet marketing Tag

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SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: Are your company’s social media marketing efforts centrally run?
  • Yes — one division handles social media outreach for the whole company 63.16%
  • No — different divisions handle their own social media outreach 33.83%
  • Not applicable — my company outsources its social media or doesn’t use it for marketing 3.01%
Having one division handle all social media outreach has some obvious benefits: It’s easier to maintain a consistent tone, it avoids too-many-cooks-in-the-kitchen confusion and it allows for specialization. The social media mavens can handle the tweeting

This post was written by Mirna Bard, a social media consultant, speaker, author and instructor of social media at the University of California at Irvine. SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: How would you compare the costs of social media marketing and traditional marketing channels, relative to their returns?
  • Traditional marketing is more expensive than social media marketing – 43.48%
  • It is difficult to compare the two – 41.74%
  • Social media marketing is more expensive than traditional marketing channels – 12.17%
  • They cost about the same – 2.61%
A couple of weeks ago, I was in a meeting with several executives who were debating

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The current environment for advertising and marketing is rapidly shifting. No longer are companies able to slide by with the basic strategies implemented in the past. With new digital developments changing on a continuous basis, being nimble and adaptable to these new forms of communication will be critical to getting the message effectively to consumers and shoppers alike. Already, we have seen huge changes: * From traditional media to multiple forms of communication * From mass to niche media, centered around specific target audiences * From a manufacturer-dominated market to a retailer-dominated, shopper centric market. * From general-focus advertising and marketing to data-based marketing * From limited Internet access to 24/7 Internet availability and access to goods and services The booming culture of social media is also creating countless opportunities for

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]New scheme of estimation advertising effectiveness[/caption]
In my introductory ad classes, students review two ad articles each quarter. And from the very first class I taught in January of 2001, an overwhelming number of reviews have extolled the glory of highly targeted advertising on the web. These articles described a virtual eden – where advertising’s power is increased because ad dollars are spent only on communication with those who care. Just imagine, they say, targeting by interest, by their browsing history, by online purchase history, by selection of keywords in the past 10 years, and perhaps even by the genetic make-up of the consumer’s children Ten years later, how is Eden? The answer is decidedly “mixed”. First, response rates to web advertising are horrible. I was reading

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Digital advances are changing the shopper marketing landscape daily. Think about it: we are almost never away from a digital gadget today. At home, we have our computers. On our commute, many of us are surfing the web or checking emails on our mobile phones. At the café, there’s a 3G connection that will have you up and running while you sip your morning latté. Consequently, every digital development offers new opportunities for brands to grab attention, so this year at the SymphonyIRI Group Summit, we are proud to offer many exciting sessions that will help you hone the tools in your digital marketing arsenal. To set the scene, Steve Frenda, Managing Director of In-Store Marketing Institute, will help us break down the current media environment, and decipher shifts in shopper behavior in our “Future Marketing – Digital and Mobile” track session. Building on those key elements, comScore will focus on the key trends in digital marketing for the CPG industry. comScore will present its insights into the industry’s ad effectiveness and growth opportunities in one session, and share study findings from

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Don’t you hate it when facts interfere with a good story? That must be the way Facebook feels today. Scoop is, somebody cared enough about where their money was going to take a hard look at the effectiveness of Facebook ads. A dedicated Facebook user’s response just might be “Ads? They have ads on Facebook?”. (Yup, those clusters of 20 words or so that clutter the right hand side of the page – sometimes with microscopic images attached.) And, that’s exactly the problem. We now learn that the clickthrough rate on Facebook ads is .051%. (Here is a summary of the study by Webtrends.) To be clear, that’s 5 one-hundredths of a percent. Or, one click through for every 2000 times your ad is displayed. Heck, maybe this rate is pretty good since your ad is probably only noticed once out of every 1999 times it’s seen. But it is scary that this clickthrough rate is DOWN. That’s right, the click-through rate was an astronomical .063% in 2009. And, there’s one more key concern. Facebook ads should be highly

Paying people to hold signs is one of the olde...
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In the late 1990′s, the tech industry hype machine went into over-drive telling us that the web would replace retail and become the biggest sales channel for every product on earth. Of course, it didn’t happen. Today, brick & mortar retail dominates purchases – and does so while using the web as one of many communication options and as a small, but important, sales channel. The hype machine's  take on advertising? The same hype machine is now leaping at social media, viral campaigns, and online video as the voodoo that will rescue the web from a minority role in marketing. (How else do you, bring all those grand advertising dollars to the web-guru's and their VC’s who backed the hype machine?) Once again, are these broad claims going to be bogus? Or is the theory