Google Tag

A great guest piece from Dan Schock, Google Retail Team Director

Search as a means of driving sales has evolved in the past few years. As recently as three years ago, most retailers and brands still viewed their “Internet” plan as a means of driving e-commerce. The Internet was a distribution and sales channel measured by its ability to drive online revenues.

Then, as the Internet evolved into a broader media platform where consumers researched, watched videos and compared products/prices, and then often made their purchases in a physical store, many advanced companies began to include offline sales as an additional factor in measuring their overall Search ROI. In 2011, the most forward-thinking retailers and brands have started looking at a new measurement to calculate the success of their online campaigns: new customer acquisition and the lifetime value of those new customers. Think about your own search strategy: most likely you bid on as many of your brand terms as possible. And you should: here are customers that know you, who are raising their hands (via “queries”) and asking for information, then converting at a high ROI. But what about “non-brand” terms: queries higher up the purchase funnel like “makeup”, “detergent” or "paper towels”? These shoppers are still browsing and researching but they’re not converting at the same rate as those searching for your brand terms, so you may either not be buying non-brand terms them or buying very few. Why? – Most likely because you’re hooked on those brand ROIs. Why pay a higher CPC for a lower conversion rate?  
I’ll tell you why: because those non-brand terms drive a higher percentage of new customers to your site – and when you consider the lifetime value of those customers they will pay off! Here are people looking for products and services you offer, but did not think to type your brand into the search box. You are not (yet) part of their top consideration set. And look at the advertisers

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="153" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Behold the iPad in All Its Glory.[/caption]

Tablets Will Be Key To Marketing

  With more than 165 million tablets expected to ship over the next two years, tablets are becoming a popular device with engaged, tech-savvy consumers. Given this explosive growth, tablets need to be a part of your marketing strategy. So Google is now making it easy for you to target tablet devices. We’re pleased to announce that we’re developing new targeting options to help you better connect with this audience. To give you greater control over your AdWords ads, we’re changing the way you can target tablet devices.

Networks & Devices

In the next couple of weeks, the “Networks and Devices” section of you r Settings tab within your AdWords account will include a new targeting option titled “Tablets with full browsers.” While you’ve been able to specifically target Apple iPad devices in the past, the new capability will enable you to easily target your ads to the entire tablet device category. In addition, you'll be able to select more precisely the types of devices and operating systems on which your AdWords ads will show. For example, to display

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="220" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]a chart to describe the search engine market[/caption]
The rise of food blogging and online recipe sites has really driven home the point that consumers are turning to technology for their cooking needs. We used to thumb through the pages of cookbooks to decide what to make for tonight’s dinner. Now, we plug our requirements into a search engine, sort through the best rated recipes, and read how others have spiced it up before pulling out our chopping boards. To give you a sense for how prevalent this trend is, last year Google received over 6.1 Billion searches for food and recipes in the US alone. And that doesn’t even include beverage searches. But the food industry isn’t the only one affected by consumer’s changing digital habits. Now, grocery shoppers

This post was written by Mirna Bard, a social-media consultant, speaker, author and instructor of social media at the University of California at Irvine. SmartPulse — our weekly reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social-media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: Would you pay a monthly fee to use a social-networking site?
  • I would rather delete my account than pay a service charge  — 58.49%
  • I would pay only if I was using it for professional/business reasons — 28.30%
  • I would need my network to introduce some extra features to make paying the fee worthwhile  — 9.97%
  • I’d be happy to pay, if the fee was reasonable  — 3.23%
Many studies are detailing the rapid growth of social-network use. Is there anything that could bring this trend to a half? If this week’s poll numbers are any indication, social networks imposing a fee might just do the trick. A majority of SmartBrief on Social Media readers say they would rather

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300"]a chart to describe the search engine market Image via Wikipedia[/caption]

In today's world, one of the highest revenue-generating companies is tech companies. With a vast network and thousands of employees, companies like these never seem to go out of business. If you are planning to start a tech company, I would recommend you visit the techygeeks website to read everything about it. With many companies in the market, providing the same service, only the one who uses the right marketing tool to capture customers can gain profits. Search engine optimization is a powerful marketing tool, but the concept remains misunderstood and underutilized, says Rand Fishkin, the CEO and founder of SEOmoz.org, who spoke at the What’s Next: DC conference about why SEO is a viable opportunity for all marketers.

Most search-engine advertising budgets allocate about 15% of the total spend for SEO and as much as 85% on pay-per-click listings, Fishkin says. But 80% of clicks actually occur in organic search results. These are the results that show up below Google’s pay-per-click listings. In other words, advertisers are spending around 85% of their budgets in a place where only 20% of clicks actually happen. The thing advertisers lack is the right amount of knowledge, fortunaly you can get the help of professional with good knowledge like those from SEO Boise. They might know everything in general, but that will not help in the long term, as in-depth knowledge is vital. Speaking of which, you can check on this site to know the real cost of link building and how much you should be paying for it.

To show up at the top of organic search results, you’ll need a better search ranking — which can be improved by using SEO. And a better SEO score can be attained when you take the aid of SEO companies like Sirlinksalot.

If your business goals are to be rank #1 for all relative search terms and sustain that top position, you will require a more thorough and long-term SEO campaign. A comprehensive strategy will need more work and time invested to achieve those higher business goals, and therefore the SEO prices Perth will be higher. If your business goals are to increase visibility and experience moderately higher rates of traffic, less work may be required. A more conservative and local SEO Perth strategy will allow for lower SEO prices due to less time needing to be put in to achieve those goals.

Fishkin suggests:

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="160" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Quel ricco sfondato di Mark Zuckerberg, founde...[/caption]
Don’t you hate it when facts interfere with a good story? That must be the way Facebook feels today. Scoop is, somebody cared enough about where their money was going to take a hard look at the effectiveness of Facebook ads. A dedicated Facebook user’s response just might be “Ads? They have ads on Facebook?”. (Yup, those clusters of 20 words or so that clutter the right hand side of the page – sometimes with microscopic images attached.) And, that’s exactly the problem. We now learn that the clickthrough rate on Facebook ads is .051%. (Here is a summary of the study by Webtrends.) To be clear, that’s 5 one-hundredths of a percent. Or, one click through for every 2000 times your ad is displayed. Heck, maybe this rate is pretty good since your ad is probably only noticed once out of every 1999 times it’s seen. But it is scary that this clickthrough rate is DOWN. That’s right, the click-through rate was an astronomical .063% in 2009. And, there’s one more key concern. Facebook ads should be highly

Cross posted from the Google Retail blog by Heidi Spector, Google Retail TeamDo you know that 89% of consumers started their holiday shopping online?Or that searches for 'coupons' peak on Saturdays?If not, you should visit our ThinkHoliday site: www.google.com/thinkholiday where you’ll be privy to a...

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