Consumer Tag

Tablets are for fun, while laptops are for work, both play a role in consumer packaged goods.


Tablets have quickly emerged as a distinctconsumer_packaged_goods_laptopconsumer_packaged_goods_ipad third digital screen in consumers lives that fill the gap between desktops and smartphones. But there are still many open questions about exactly how consumers are using them. We explored tablet search trends earlier this year, but wanted to dig deeper and answer key questions such as: What are the contrasts between tablet use, laptop use, and smartphone use and how are consumers engaging across these devices? What are the most common activities (playing games, searching, reading, etc.) that tablets are used for? What ads are most relevant and useful based on how people are using the devices?                                 

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="160" caption="Image via CrunchBase"]Image representing Steve Jobs as depicted in C...[/caption]
Have you heard the “Jobs Excuse”? When someone introduces a bad idea with “well Steve Jobs says” or “…just like Apple…”. It’s an old name dropping game that hopes to make even horrid ideas sound good. In the world of market research, we hear it most often through one popular quote from Mr. Jobs: “It’s really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” (BusinessWeek, May 1998) The Good. You have to read this quote carefully because what it says is:
- Focus groups aren’t good places to design products. - Only you know what’s possible thru technology - People can’t project ahead to tell you what to build.
He is absolutely right. Far too often, focus groups are asked to answer things consumer participants don’t know and can’t imagine. It’s an exceptionally poor use of research. In advertising, this type or research often asks consumers to decide the colors used in ads or to project what a finished ad might look like based on storyboards or sketches (it’s hard enough for experts to do that – much less consumers). In the extreme, it can even lead to

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="159" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]"Get fat on Lorings Fat-ten-u and corpula...[/caption]
I suppose you might read the title of this post and expect an altruistic discussion. Or expect to find ramblings about how account planners should dig into sociological meanings to develop connections with consumers (have you noticed how esoteric account planning has become?). But I want to discuss something very different — something the ad business seems to forget — effective advertising’s truly human value and the society-wide value this builds. I turn to this topic today because advertising in 2011 is a pretty cynical business where many agency execs bring in large salaries while resenting anything so low brow as connecting “advertising” with sales. The idea of ever asking a consumer to purchase a product seems crass. In fact, read carefully what agencies say about themselves and you’ll find a serious dis-like of “advertising” in general (usually detected by what’s omitted from their discussion – like any understanding of business). It’s too bad. Because good advertising is quite fundamentally human and is quite valuable to society.
Consumerism is as old as mankind itself. In fact, consumerism started when the first hunters found they could shop for rock types and find rocks that were more effective. Or when one animal skin was preferred over another for any number of reasons. I think brand also shows up quite early – like when weapon makers repetitively selected specific types of rock (e.g. flint) because they knew it made better weapons. In other words: exercising choice

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="220" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]a chart to describe the search engine market[/caption]
The rise of food blogging and online recipe sites has really driven home the point that consumers are turning to technology for their cooking needs. We used to thumb through the pages of cookbooks to decide what to make for tonight’s dinner. Now, we plug our requirements into a search engine, sort through the best rated recipes, and read how others have spiced it up before pulling out our chopping boards. To give you a sense for how prevalent this trend is, last year Google received over 6.1 Billion searches for food and recipes in the US alone. And that doesn’t even include beverage searches. But the food industry isn’t the only one affected by consumer’s changing digital habits. Now, grocery shoppers

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="222" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]SymphonyIRI Group logo[/caption]
Competition for Share of Consumer Spending is Intensifying as the Country Emerges from Recession CHICAGO, March 3, 2011 - Consumers deserted shopping malls and car dealerships in droves to spend wisely and save in 2009. While this conservative mindset has stuck with many consumers, others increased spending at least somewhat during 2010. The CPG industry demonstrated signs of improvement, with unit sales declines slowing markedly across channels, and some departments and categories experiencing positive sales trends for the first time in five quarters. SymphonyIRI Group continues its analysis of the CPG industry's performance throughout the past year and identifies new market opportunities in its latest report, "Times & Trends: CPG 2010 Year in Review: Out of Turmoil Rises Opportunity." "Although many are breathing a sigh of relief since the "Great Recession" officially

This post was written by SmartBrief technology editor Susan Rush. If you think social TV is only for young, hip viewers, you are mistaken. Live televised events or TV series that have loyal fan bases are perfect candidates to add social TV elements — that was one of the takeaways from the “Social Television — . Where will social TV work? To open the session, panel moderator Richard Sussman of The Nielsen Co., pointed to the success the 2010 Oscars had with Facebook, noting that “Facebook was the winner of the Oscars.” Shows like the

Two phones with mobile internet capability dis...
Image via Wikipedia
The role of social media and mobile marketing will be realized and leveraged in 2011 by CPG marketers lest they fall behind the curve. Savvy marketers for manufacturers and retailers will need to experiment in order to effectively understand and leverage social media and mobile marketing platforms that will inevitably impact people as they transition from consumers, into shoppers, and to customers. 2011 will separate the leaders from the followers. SymphonyIRI’s Robert (Bob) I. Tomei, President, Consumer & Shopper Marketing, outlined these predictions for 2011 in Research Business Report’s 15th Annual Predictions Issue. Read more about these predictions below… “In 2011, CPG marketers (manufacturers and retailers) will start to realize the power of “direct-to-shopper” marketing by leveraging multi-platforms to reach key consumers at home, online and in-store. The media component of this activity will begin to integrate social media and mobile marketing with traditional media plans. Most have an outstanding ability to harness traditional means today, but are flying blind concerning how people

Strom Thurmond was my wingman in college. Not literally, of course. I only met him once, for about a minute in the spring of 2000. But I got a story out of that meeting that I would later tell to almost every girl I ever tried to impress. Part of that stems from the fact that I went to a university where people talk about politics all the time, but mostly it’s just a really funny story. But I can’t tell it to you. It’s totally apolitical and G-rated. I now tell it in lots of non-date scenarios, including once in a successful job interview, but it would flop on a blog because to tell it right, I have to be able to touch your elbow at one point. The story falls apart without that gesture. And that’s why I told it over and over again. Touching someone, even briefly, creates a bond. You’re creating a literal symbol of the personal connection you now share. It is powerful voodoo.