Channel Tag

Brand has become the marketing religion of our time and takes on outsized importance in every decision. And that leads to a bunch of lists – each claiming to reveal “the” absolutes of brand building. The following makes no claim about summarizing absolutes. But the more lists I see, the more I love the far more humble and practical sense of brands found among this bakers dozen. And, the more I think they reveal important things that enthusiastic brand enthusiasts seem to have forgotten:
1. Brands build through YEARS of consistent efforts.
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2. No, really. Brands build far slower than anyone wants to think. 3. Building a brand requires not only years, but consistent execution throughout that time. 4. Convincing consumers of a product’s unique value creates brand far more quickly than does lifestyle communication. 5. There are many ways your business can leverage advertising to drive profitability other than “Brand Building”. 6. There are many flavors and types of advertising – all will build brand. That means so-called “brand advertising” may be exactly the wrong way to build your brand. 7. Most brand theorists seem to love exotic and abstract

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I once sat in a meeting discussing a highly successful TV campaign. Underlying the discussion there’s this funny unspoken question from the brand side of the house: “How can it be good branding if it sold so well?” The truth is that product is your best way to build brand. But this has been lost by the billion dollar brand consultancies and amidst the plethora of marketing PhD dissertations – with collusion from creative teams who learn the hard way that their best opportunity to get the NEXT ad job is to ignore product in THIS one. Consider the brand ecosystem chart Forrester tweeted today. (Link here.) I challenge you to find product in this brand activity chart. Oh, yes. It’s there…somewhere…amidst all the complexity. It took me a while to find it. But the product seems to be hidden

This post was written by Mirna Bard, a social media consultant, speaker, author and instructor of social media at the University of California at Irvine. SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: How would you compare the costs of social media marketing and traditional marketing channels, relative to their returns?
  • Traditional marketing is more expensive than social media marketing – 43.48%
  • It is difficult to compare the two – 41.74%
  • Social media marketing is more expensive than traditional marketing channels – 12.17%
  • They cost about the same – 2.61%
A couple of weeks ago, I was in a meeting with several executives who were debating

Angry Retail Customers Are A Marketers Dream? Can Be...

This guest post is by Daley Epstein, a contributing writer for SmartBrief.
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Whether your a retailer or distributor, when an angry, dissatisfied customer uses Twitter, it doesn’t matter whether he’s a big or little spender  — each post holds the same presence on the Internet, said Rob La Gesse, director of media marketing at Rackspace Hosting.  La Gesse suggests an old-fashioned, yet underused, approach toward social media: Customer love. He offers three things to keep in mind when dealing with an upset customer:
  • Don’t freak out. Costumers aren’t evil!
  • Customers need your help and may need to vent, let them.
  • If your company broke a promise or you have a broken process, its better to have an angry customer than a lost customer.
“If you don’t love working with customers, you shouldn’t be in retail marketing anyway",

This post was written by SmartBrief technology editor Susan Rush. If you think social TV is only for young, hip viewers, you are mistaken. Live televised events or TV series that have loyal fan bases are perfect candidates to add social TV elements — that was one of the takeaways from the “Social Television — . Where will social TV work? To open the session, panel moderator Richard Sussman of The Nielsen Co., pointed to the success the 2010 Oscars had with Facebook, noting that “Facebook was the winner of the Oscars.” Shows like the

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This post was written by SmartBrief’s Elizabeth Collins. The pharmaceutical companies that say they are waiting for the Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidance on how to handle drug promotion through social media are just using the FDA’s guidance delay as an “out,” or an excuse, said Glenn Byrd, MedImmune’s director of regulatory affairs, at the Marcus Evans “Social Media for Pharma” conference in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Some in the industry feel that when the FDA finally issues its social media guidance, answers to all their questions will suddenly become clear, he says. He doesn’t think that will be the case. He points to what we already know, however, which should be enough to get companies started. The FDA will regulate anything a pharmaceutical company does to generate interest in its products, and Byrd reminded the audience that the FDA has already made clear what its expectations are in regards to advertisements and promotions. “There’s already guidance

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Dollar stores are seeing tremendous growth thanks to shoppers’ new addiction to deals. Leslie Eaton’s article in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, Dollar Stores Keep Trucking, takes a look at the phenomenon that we expect will stick around after this holiday season passes. As we saw not only in our recent report on holiday shopping rituals, which Ms. Eaton refers to in her article, but also in a previous report, The New Path to Purchase: An Escalation of Channel & Consumption Migration, shoppers have cut back on the number of channels they patronize, concentrating on stores known for lower prices, visiting stores less frequently and spending less per trip. SymphonyIRI suggests to manufacturers and retailers that these learned coping behaviors are