Business Tag

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="159" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]"Get fat on Lorings Fat-ten-u and corpula...[/caption]
I suppose you might read the title of this post and expect an altruistic discussion. Or expect to find ramblings about how account planners should dig into sociological meanings to develop connections with consumers (have you noticed how esoteric account planning has become?). But I want to discuss something very different — something the ad business seems to forget — effective advertising’s truly human value and the society-wide value this builds. I turn to this topic today because advertising in 2011 is a pretty cynical business where many agency execs bring in large salaries while resenting anything so low brow as connecting “advertising” with sales. The idea of ever asking a consumer to purchase a product seems crass. In fact, read carefully what agencies say about themselves and you’ll find a serious dis-like of “advertising” in general (usually detected by what’s omitted from their discussion – like any understanding of business). It’s too bad. Because good advertising is quite fundamentally human and is quite valuable to society.
Consumerism is as old as mankind itself. In fact, consumerism started when the first hunters found they could shop for rock types and find rocks that were more effective. Or when one animal skin was preferred over another for any number of reasons. I think brand also shows up quite early – like when weapon makers repetitively selected specific types of rock (e.g. flint) because they knew it made better weapons. In other words: exercising choice

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="151" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]BBU Logo[/caption]
Thursday, March 24, 2011 by Jennifer Randall Take your best guess—what was the average DSD in-stock level found to be in a recent study published in SupermarketNews.com? I was a little surprised that the figure was actually 98 percent, especially given that other similar studies of both DSD and warehouse-supplied products put the average in-stock level between 92 and 94 percent. The study used shelf analysis based on six categories at 28 different retail stores, as well as interviews with DSD route drivers. Retailers participating in the study included Cub Foods, Hannaford Bros., Kroger, Safeway, Save Mart, Wegmans and Winn-Dixie. DSD vendors participating included Bimbo Bakeries, Dreyer, Flower Foods, Kellogg,

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]New scheme of estimation advertising effectiveness[/caption]
In my introductory ad classes, students review two ad articles each quarter. And from the very first class I taught in January of 2001, an overwhelming number of reviews have extolled the glory of highly targeted advertising on the web. These articles described a virtual eden – where advertising’s power is increased because ad dollars are spent only on communication with those who care. Just imagine, they say, targeting by interest, by their browsing history, by online purchase history, by selection of keywords in the past 10 years, and perhaps even by the genetic make-up of the consumer’s children Ten years later, how is Eden? The answer is decidedly “mixed”. First, response rates to web advertising are horrible. I was reading

CPG and Retail Companies Must Wean Shoppers Off Price-Only Related Merchandising for Future Success
Magnificent Mile Apple Store
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CHICAGO, Jan. 20, 2011 - The new year creates an opportunity to review product and retail strategies with a view toward continuous improvement. Nowhere is this more relevant or important than in merchandising strategies. To take a closer look at these strategies, SymphonyIRI Group released its current issue of Times & Trends, “Merchandising Trends: Achieving Differentiation with a Shopper-Centric Approach,” which explores current and emerging merchandising trends that CPG marketers have embraced during the last few years in an ongoing effort to satisfy shoppers’ rapidly changing definition of value. SymphonyIRI anticipates shoppers will remain conservative in their purchasing habits, but evolve their definition of “value” slowly away from the almost singular focus on price that has shaped behavior for the past three years. The new focus will be one that integrates other factors, such as ingredients to support increased health and wellness, packaging and convenience. “Approaching CPG merchandising from a shopper-centric perspective is critical and will become increasingly

Image by Getty Images via @daylife Sansolo Speaks: Poker Face Report: Supervalu Trying To Sell Shaws, But No Takers Food Fight: The Disconnect Between Costs & Prices Congress Passes Food Safety Legislation Fresh Direct Said To Be Seeking $ 200 Million To Fund Expansion Lowes Foods-To-Go Tests Express Service Dollar Stores...

Paying people to hold signs is one of the olde...
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In the late 1990′s, the tech industry hype machine went into over-drive telling us that the web would replace retail and become the biggest sales channel for every product on earth. Of course, it didn’t happen. Today, brick & mortar retail dominates purchases – and does so while using the web as one of many communication options and as a small, but important, sales channel. The hype machine's  take on advertising? The same hype machine is now leaping at social media, viral campaigns, and online video as the voodoo that will rescue the web from a minority role in marketing. (How else do you, bring all those grand advertising dollars to the web-guru's and their VC’s who backed the hype machine?) Once again, are these broad claims going to be bogus? Or is the theory