brands Tag

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="185" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Lady GaGa concert[/caption]
If you’re a marketer saddled with promoting a dull brand using social media, how do you compete with sexy brands such as Lady Gaga and Coca-Cola? Give your brand the rock-star treatment. Even if you’re not in a sexy industry, you can treat it as such. I wrote an award-winning book on quilting, but you’re never going to see me on “American Idol” or “America’s Got Talent.” No one wants to watch me at my sewing machine creating quilts, no matter how amazing they are. Unless you’re a quilter, too. Quilters are interested, and they will watch. But how did I make my content sexier? I produced a music video of 12 quilted table runners I designed over a year and set it to music my son arranged on GarageBand. I gave the audience a behind-the-scenes glimpse of my creative process, from original drawings, color palettes and design journals to a tour of finished quilts. How can you do something similar for your industry? Give it the rock-star treatment. Think music video, VIP pass, backstage access, T-shirt and memorabilia. Make your brand fun, place it on stage and rock on. Even if your product isn’t as glamorous as rock music, television or the big screen, treat it as such. Give your audience special treatment, and you’ll see traffic and sales increase. Be memorable. Let your personality and that of your staff shine through, so your brand is approachable and personable. Southwest Airlines flight attendant David Holmes raps the normal snoozer of the flight-safety speech. Passengers not only pay attention but also

Angry Retail Customers Are A Marketers Dream? Can Be...

This guest post is by Daley Epstein, a contributing writer for SmartBrief.
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="250" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Free twitter badge[/caption]
Whether your a retailer or distributor, when an angry, dissatisfied customer uses Twitter, it doesn’t matter whether he’s a big or little spender  — each post holds the same presence on the Internet, said Rob La Gesse, director of media marketing at Rackspace Hosting.  La Gesse suggests an old-fashioned, yet underused, approach toward social media: Customer love. He offers three things to keep in mind when dealing with an upset customer:
  • Don’t freak out. Costumers aren’t evil!
  • Customers need your help and may need to vent, let them.
  • If your company broke a promise or you have a broken process, its better to have an angry customer than a lost customer.
“If you don’t love working with customers, you shouldn’t be in retail marketing anyway",

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase
SmartPulse — our weekly reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social-media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: Do you think Facebook gets more attention than it deserves?
  • It does not deserve this much attention — 47.62%
  • It is worth all the attention it’s getting — 31.22%
  • I don’t pay attention to all the hype around Facebook — 21.16%
Whether it’s offline or online, everywhere we turn someone is talking about

Netflix
Image via Wikipedia
This morning’s New York Times reports on the the 2010 Nielsen wrap up. And the summary? “TV Viewing Continues to Edge Up” (click for link). In fact, TV prognosticators, programmers and ad practitioners today have to sort out the contradiction between: (a) the venture funded hype about internet TV, (b) the legitimate possibility that some kind of internet distribution could harm the TV business, (c) the good consumer value that might be created with various kinds of internet distribution, and (d) the continuing health of traditional TV. (Beyond the Times, last week we received this solid report about cable subs from Time Warner.) TV clearly will be changing. But will it be destructive change like has happened to newspapers? I doubt it. TV is a very healthy industry – there’s lots of money and

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Safeway Lifestyle Produce"]Safeway Store Lifestyle look Produce Dept.[/caption]
By Susan Viamari, Editor, Times & Trends As has been the case in past recessionary periods, the country's latest economic downturn served to reinforce store brands' position within the CPG industry. But, the recession has prompted change across national brand manufacturers as well. From new products to pricing, national brand CPG marketers are rethinking their strategies in an effort to protect and grow share of their own product lines. National brand manufacturers have made progress. Store brand share gains have slowed, in some

Store Brands Activity

Swedish grocery store where private label prod...
Image via Wikipedia
Nearly every household in the United States purchases store brands today, and 80 percent of consumers believe store brand products are equal or superior to national brands in terms of quality, value and packaging. These are just two statistics that demonstrate the remarkable strength of store brands. Retailers have introduced sophisticated strategies to build store brand dollar and unit share growth, while national brand manufacturers have responded with aggressive new marketing strategies of their own. SymphonyIRI Group, Inc. announced today the availability of two new reports that analyze the dynamics of today’s store brands market. New executive research, titled “Understanding and Mitigating the Private Label Threat,”