Marketing strategy

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="153" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Behold the iPad in All Its Glory.[/caption]

Tablets Will Be Key To Marketing

  With more than 165 million tablets expected to ship over the next two years, tablets are becoming a popular device with engaged, tech-savvy consumers. Given this explosive growth, tablets need to be a part of your marketing strategy. So Google is now making it easy for you to target tablet devices. We’re pleased to announce that we’re developing new targeting options to help you better connect with this audience. To give you greater control over your AdWords ads, we’re changing the way you can target tablet devices.

Networks & Devices

In the next couple of weeks, the “Networks and Devices” section of you r Settings tab within your AdWords account will include a new targeting option titled “Tablets with full browsers.” While you’ve been able to specifically target Apple iPad devices in the past, the new capability will enable you to easily target your ads to the entire tablet device category. In addition, you'll be able to select more precisely the types of devices and operating systems on which your AdWords ads will show. For example, to display

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="243"]Lady Gaga performing on the Fame Ball tour in ... Image via Wikipedia[/caption]
For some time, marketing has been dominated by the theory that the way to success is getting your most loyal consumers to buy more. As a result, it’s become popular for marketing “guru”s to declare the end of mass marketing. There’s just one problem: it’s not true. The best discussion of this reality that I’ve seen recently is found in Byron Sharp’s book “How Brands Grow” (2010, Oxford). Let me share a few of the realities I found in this excellent, and challenging, read. Remember the “80/20″ Rule? It’s Wrong. In the 1930′s an Italian economist named Pareto suggested that 80% of a country’s wealth come from 20% of its citizens. Since then, this suggestion has been applied where it shouldn’t and been turned into a “rule”. (One such rule might be that “80% of manufacturing errors come from 20% of the process” – something that is sometimes true.) In marketing, the 80/20 rule has come to claim that 80% of a company’s sales come from 20% of its consumers. Marketers use this to claim that the fastest way to increase profit is to convince the 20% to buy more – an idea that glorifies niche marketing and loyalty programs.

In Marketing...there Are Fundamental Problems With the 80/20 Rule.

Sharp analyzed this rule with hard marketing numbers from a large number of client campaigns. Let me note three findings:
The most loyal 20% of consumers drive only 50% of purchases – not 80. The top 20% are the most expensive (in marketing dollars) way to increase sales. I’ve found they are often fully satisfied and don’t want/need more from your brand. Today’s loyal are tomorrow’s disloyal. Sharp documents the human animal’s polygamous brand tendencies – making purchases from a wide range of brands. One result of brand polygamy is that a very large number of today’s loyal customers will be less loyal in the future.
Net out: Loyalists may just be the worst place to invest a large portion of your communication dollars. So How Do Big Brands Succeed? Sharp suggests part of the answer is in the Double Jeopardy Law:
“Small brands have far fewer customers and those customers buy slightly less often.”
So brands that grow big do so by reaching out and expanding their base of consumers. For a taste of what Sharp has to say, see his presentation in this Ted video. Sharp points to Apple as an example. Tech competitors blame Apple success on fanboys. But Apple has become big because my neighbors have iPods, iPhones and now iMacs. (Just look at the vast amount of Apple hardware on airplanes owned by people you’d never expect to buy Apple.) This is true of brands like Nike and even, I suspect a brand who makes loyalty the centerpiece of their marketing like Nordstrom. In a category close to my heart, it’s true for DeWalt drills. Yes, a lot of contractors buy them. But contractor sales don’t make DeWalt huge. DeWalt is huge because suburban garages are filled with DeWalt drills. Doesn’t Social Media Show Niche Marketing is More Powerful? Not when you analyze the total communication picture around social media. “New media success stories” are mostly mass media success stories given additional legs in social media. How so? In most cases, new media’s role is to create enough awareness to get mass media outlets to deliver coverage in TV, print, newspaper, radio, etc… Then, and only then, does the big impact start. It's amazing what a little print can do for a business. If done well, it can drastically change the outcome of any campaign. For two examples look at Susan Boyle’s record sales or Lady Gaga’s massive YouTube numbers – both are the result of traditional media exposure. (Just notice how much print space Gaga gets.) And the recent Old Spice campaign generated

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="159" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]"Get fat on Lorings Fat-ten-u and corpula...[/caption]
I suppose you might read the title of this post and expect an altruistic discussion. Or expect to find ramblings about how account planners should dig into sociological meanings to develop connections with consumers (have you noticed how esoteric account planning has become?). But I want to discuss something very different — something the ad business seems to forget — effective advertising’s truly human value and the society-wide value this builds. I turn to this topic today because advertising in 2011 is a pretty cynical business where many agency execs bring in large salaries while resenting anything so low brow as connecting “advertising” with sales. The idea of ever asking a consumer to purchase a product seems crass. In fact, read carefully what agencies say about themselves and you’ll find a serious dis-like of “advertising” in general (usually detected by what’s omitted from their discussion – like any understanding of business). It’s too bad. Because good advertising is quite fundamentally human and is quite valuable to society.
Consumerism is as old as mankind itself. In fact, consumerism started when the first hunters found they could shop for rock types and find rocks that were more effective. Or when one animal skin was preferred over another for any number of reasons. I think brand also shows up quite early – like when weapon makers repetitively selected specific types of rock (e.g. flint) because they knew it made better weapons. In other words: exercising choice

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="151" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]BBU Logo[/caption]
Thursday, March 24, 2011 by Jennifer Randall Take your best guess—what was the average DSD in-stock level found to be in a recent study published in SupermarketNews.com? I was a little surprised that the figure was actually 98 percent, especially given that other similar studies of both DSD and warehouse-supplied products put the average in-stock level between 92 and 94 percent. The study used shelf analysis based on six categories at 28 different retail stores, as well as interviews with DSD route drivers. Retailers participating in the study included Cub Foods, Hannaford Bros., Kroger, Safeway, Save Mart, Wegmans and Winn-Dixie. DSD vendors participating included Bimbo Bakeries, Dreyer, Flower Foods, Kellogg,

This post was written by Mirna Bard, a social media consultant, speaker, author and instructor of social media at the University of California at Irvine. SmartPulse — our weekly nonscientific reader poll in SmartBrief on Social Media — tracks feedback from leading marketers about social media practices and issues. Last week’s poll question: How would you compare the costs of social media marketing and traditional marketing channels, relative to their returns?
  • Traditional marketing is more expensive than social media marketing – 43.48%
  • It is difficult to compare the two – 41.74%
  • Social media marketing is more expensive than traditional marketing channels – 12.17%
  • They cost about the same – 2.61%
A couple of weeks ago, I was in a meeting with several executives who were debating

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="255" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Follow me on Twitter logo[/caption]
The current environment for advertising and marketing is rapidly shifting. No longer are companies able to slide by with the basic strategies implemented in the past. With new digital developments changing on a continuous basis, being nimble and adaptable to these new forms of communication will be critical to getting the message effectively to consumers and shoppers alike. Already, we have seen huge changes: * From traditional media to multiple forms of communication * From mass to niche media, centered around specific target audiences * From a manufacturer-dominated market to a retailer-dominated, shopper centric market. * From general-focus advertising and marketing to data-based marketing * From limited Internet access to 24/7 Internet availability and access to goods and services The booming culture of social media is also creating countless opportunities for

Angry Retail Customers Are A Marketers Dream? Can Be...

This guest post is by Daley Epstein, a contributing writer for SmartBrief.
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="250" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Free twitter badge[/caption]
Whether your a retailer or distributor, when an angry, dissatisfied customer uses Twitter, it doesn’t matter whether he’s a big or little spender  — each post holds the same presence on the Internet, said Rob La Gesse, director of media marketing at Rackspace Hosting.  La Gesse suggests an old-fashioned, yet underused, approach toward social media: Customer love. He offers three things to keep in mind when dealing with an upset customer:
  • Don’t freak out. Costumers aren’t evil!
  • Customers need your help and may need to vent, let them.
  • If your company broke a promise or you have a broken process, its better to have an angry customer than a lost customer.
“If you don’t love working with customers, you shouldn’t be in retail marketing anyway",