In Store Marketing

Tablets are for fun, while laptops are for work, both play a role in consumer packaged goods.


Tablets have quickly emerged as a distinctconsumer_packaged_goods_laptopconsumer_packaged_goods_ipad third digital screen in consumers lives that fill the gap between desktops and smartphones. But there are still many open questions about exactly how consumers are using them. We explored tablet search trends earlier this year, but wanted to dig deeper and answer key questions such as: What are the contrasts between tablet use, laptop use, and smartphone use and how are consumers engaging across these devices? What are the most common activities (playing games, searching, reading, etc.) that tablets are used for? What ads are most relevant and useful based on how people are using the devices?                                 

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The current environment for advertising and marketing is rapidly shifting. No longer are companies able to slide by with the basic strategies implemented in the past. With new digital developments changing on a continuous basis, being nimble and adaptable to these new forms of communication will be critical to getting the message effectively to consumers and shoppers alike. Already, we have seen huge changes: * From traditional media to multiple forms of communication * From mass to niche media, centered around specific target audiences * From a manufacturer-dominated market to a retailer-dominated, shopper centric market. * From general-focus advertising and marketing to data-based marketing * From limited Internet access to 24/7 Internet availability and access to goods and services The booming culture of social media is also creating countless opportunities for

CPG and Retail Companies Must Wean Shoppers Off Price-Only Related Merchandising for Future Success
Magnificent Mile Apple Store
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CHICAGO, Jan. 20, 2011 - The new year creates an opportunity to review product and retail strategies with a view toward continuous improvement. Nowhere is this more relevant or important than in merchandising strategies. To take a closer look at these strategies, SymphonyIRI Group released its current issue of Times & Trends, “Merchandising Trends: Achieving Differentiation with a Shopper-Centric Approach,” which explores current and emerging merchandising trends that CPG marketers have embraced during the last few years in an ongoing effort to satisfy shoppers’ rapidly changing definition of value. SymphonyIRI anticipates shoppers will remain conservative in their purchasing habits, but evolve their definition of “value” slowly away from the almost singular focus on price that has shaped behavior for the past three years. The new focus will be one that integrates other factors, such as ingredients to support increased health and wellness, packaging and convenience. “Approaching CPG merchandising from a shopper-centric perspective is critical and will become increasingly

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The role of social media and mobile marketing will be realized and leveraged in 2011 by CPG marketers lest they fall behind the curve. Savvy marketers for manufacturers and retailers will need to experiment in order to effectively understand and leverage social media and mobile marketing platforms that will inevitably impact people as they transition from consumers, into shoppers, and to customers. 2011 will separate the leaders from the followers. SymphonyIRI’s Robert (Bob) I. Tomei, President, Consumer & Shopper Marketing, outlined these predictions for 2011 in Research Business Report’s 15th Annual Predictions Issue. Read more about these predictions below… “In 2011, CPG marketers (manufacturers and retailers) will start to realize the power of “direct-to-shopper” marketing by leveraging multi-platforms to reach key consumers at home, online and in-store. The media component of this activity will begin to integrate social media and mobile marketing with traditional media plans. Most have an outstanding ability to harness traditional means today, but are flying blind concerning how people

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Paying people to hold signs is one of the olde...
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In the late 1990′s, the tech industry hype machine went into over-drive telling us that the web would replace retail and become the biggest sales channel for every product on earth. Of course, it didn’t happen. Today, brick & mortar retail dominates purchases – and does so while using the web as one of many communication options and as a small, but important, sales channel. The hype machine's  take on advertising? The same hype machine is now leaping at social media, viral campaigns, and online video as the voodoo that will rescue the web from a minority role in marketing. (How else do you, bring all those grand advertising dollars to the web-guru's and their VC’s who backed the hype machine?) Once again, are these broad claims going to be bogus? Or is the theory

Retailers must understand the details behind shoppers’ purchasing decisions if they are to enjoy continued success on the store brand front. Information Resources, Inc. (IRI) Related articles Consumers Celebrating Practicality This Holiday Season Reveals SymphonyIRI Research (eon.businesswire.com) A New Report by American Express Identifies 'A New Era of Pause...

End-user confusion about drills and drivers is rampant – although the model in this stock photo looks more bored than confused.

Consumer Packaged Goods, What's in a name... Tool makers have created a wilderness of product, category and project names that stand in the way of revenue and market share growth. And no category is more confused than drills and drivers. At the Oregon State Fair recently I ran into some impact drivers from a major brand. You know impact drivers – those great compact tools that use small bursts of torque to deliver turning power around the screw, bolt or nut. “Impact driver” is a strong label for the category of tools because they are used by pro and DIY alike primarily to drive screws and self-tapping hex headed screws (e.g. those used for steel studs). Impact drivers are also used, but less often, to drive lag bolts, remove small stuck bolts, and in a few other driving situations. In other words, from both the pro and DIY end user point of view, they are an evolution of the drill/driver. But at the fair, the boxes were labeled “impact wrench”. Huh? An impact wrench? An impact wrench is a big tool used on cars, trucks, and in factories that delivers 2500 to 7000 in-lbs of torque and is used for the heaviest duty work on cars and trucks. It also exclusively drives sockets and is used on heavy bolts. But the tool in that package was an impact driver – a tool that delivers small bursts of usually 500 to 1300 in-lbs of torque – torque that is light enough to drive screws or hex head screws without breaking them. How can we expect consumers to buy products without consistent categories and names?