Marketing strategy

Is social media driving tech accessories purchases? The answer, at this point seems to be “yes and no,’” according to Chris Ely, manager, Industry Analysis Market Research for the Consumer Electronics (CE) Association, who outlined the results of a new study during the “Tech Accessories in...

Tablets are for fun, while laptops are for work, both play a role in consumer packaged goods.


Tablets have quickly emerged as a distinctconsumer_packaged_goods_laptopconsumer_packaged_goods_ipad third digital screen in consumers lives that fill the gap between desktops and smartphones. But there are still many open questions about exactly how consumers are using them. We explored tablet search trends earlier this year, but wanted to dig deeper and answer key questions such as: What are the contrasts between tablet use, laptop use, and smartphone use and how are consumers engaging across these devices? What are the most common activities (playing games, searching, reading, etc.) that tablets are used for? What ads are most relevant and useful based on how people are using the devices? 						

Brand has become the marketing religion of our time and takes on outsized importance in every decision. And that leads to a bunch of lists – each claiming to reveal “the” absolutes of brand building. The following makes no claim about summarizing absolutes. But the more lists I see, the more I love the far more humble and practical sense of brands found among this bakers dozen. And, the more I think they reveal important things that enthusiastic brand enthusiasts seem to have forgotten:
1. Brands build through YEARS of consistent efforts.
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="184" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Pepsi logo (2003-2008). Pepsi Wild Cherry and ...[/caption]
2. No, really. Brands build far slower than anyone wants to think. 3. Building a brand requires not only years, but consistent execution throughout that time. 4. Convincing consumers of a product’s unique value creates brand far more quickly than does lifestyle communication. 5. There are many ways your business can leverage advertising to drive profitability other than “Brand Building”. 6. There are many flavors and types of advertising – all will build brand. That means so-called “brand advertising” may be exactly the wrong way to build your brand. 7. Most brand theorists seem to love exotic and abstract

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="185" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Lady GaGa concert[/caption]
If you’re a marketer saddled with promoting a dull brand using social media, how do you compete with sexy brands such as Lady Gaga and Coca-Cola? Give your brand the rock-star treatment. Even if you’re not in a sexy industry, you can treat it as such. I wrote an award-winning book on quilting, but you’re never going to see me on “American Idol” or “America’s Got Talent.” No one wants to watch me at my sewing machine creating quilts, no matter how amazing they are. Unless you’re a quilter, too. Quilters are interested, and they will watch. But how did I make my content sexier? I produced a music video of 12 quilted table runners I designed over a year and set it to music my son arranged on GarageBand. I gave the audience a behind-the-scenes glimpse of my creative process, from original drawings, color palettes and design journals to a tour of finished quilts. How can you do something similar for your industry? Give it the rock-star treatment. Think music video, VIP pass, backstage access, T-shirt and memorabilia. Make your brand fun, place it on stage and rock on. Even if your product isn’t as glamorous as rock music, television or the big screen, treat it as such. Give your audience special treatment, and you’ll see traffic and sales increase. Be memorable. Let your personality and that of your staff shine through, so your brand is approachable and personable. Southwest Airlines flight attendant David Holmes raps the normal snoozer of the flight-safety speech. Passengers not only pay attention but also

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Infographic on how Social Media are being used...[/caption]
It’s easy to get distracted by trivial social media arguments. Social media experts spend a lot of time hashing out old fights about the best tools and tactics for the same reasons some people  can spend hours looking at new faucets or cabinet doors. The less important something is, the more fun it is to kibitz about, because the responsibility that comes with being wrong is relatively minor. It doesn’t really matter what your kitchen looks like; so long as it is functional, durable and built on a stable foundation, you can have those cabinet arguments worry-free.

Key Answers to Key questions;

The trouble is, too many people have the cabinet door conversation without ever talking about the foundation. The way I see it, there are only seven questions in all of social media that really matter. Of course, they’re pretty big questions. But if you can answer them to the fullest, then the answers to many of your minor questions fall into place.
  1. Who am I speaking to? And don’t just say “potential customers.” That’s a dodge and you know it. Get specific. Think about who you’re trying to reach in terms of both demographics (age, location, income, etc.)  and psychographics (what to they believe? what do they like? what are they worried about?). And remember that the latter often tells you more than the former. Unless you really know, on an intimate level, who are you’re speaking to, everything else you’re doing is essentially guesswork, because audience knowledge informs your answer to every one of the remaining questions.
  2. What do they want from me online? The temptation is often to focus on what you want from your customers — and we’ll get to that — but you’re setting yourself up for disaster if you focus on yourself first. Because before anyone is going to do what you want, you have to give them a reason to care about you first. All businesses, nonprofits and institutions exist to serve a function. You do something that people want or need — or

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]iPad Display Item[/caption]
I once sat in a meeting discussing a highly successful TV campaign. Underlying the discussion there’s this funny unspoken question from the brand side of the house: “How can it be good branding if it sold so well?” The truth is that product is your best way to build brand. But this has been lost by the billion dollar brand consultancies and amidst the plethora of marketing PhD dissertations – with collusion from creative teams who learn the hard way that their best opportunity to get the NEXT ad job is to ignore product in THIS one. Consider the brand ecosystem chart Forrester tweeted today. (Link here.) I challenge you to find product in this brand activity chart. Oh, yes. It’s there…somewhere…amidst all the complexity. It took me a while to find it. But the product seems to be hidden

“Mobile is the glue” that binds a person’s online life to their real-world activities, argued Tim Hayden, chief marketing officer and co-founder of 44Doors, at a recent BlogWorld and New Media Expo session. Your customers are on the go, and your marketing needs to reflect that reality. But before a business can take advantage of the power of mobile, it needs to optimize its marketing efforts to reach customers on the move, Hayden said. Having an integrated mobile strategy allows customers to easily share brand experiences, lets companies tailor content and gives both sides a way to keep conversations alive following real-world interactions, he argued. Here are some of ways Hayden suggested businesses work to integrate mobile into their marketing strategy:
  • Know that simple is best. Everyone knows that social content and Web content are two different animals — and that distinction goes double

In early May, Genevieve Mazzeo, manager of public relations and social media at ConAgra Foods, spoke with SmartBrief’s Jesse Stanchak at BlogWell D.C. presented by SocialMedia.org. Mazzeo spoke about how ConAgra, the maker of brands such as Orville Redenbacher, Healthy Choice and Slim Jim, uses social media to build relationships with its various consumers.
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="177" caption="Image via Wikipedia"]Healthy Choice Logo[/caption]
  (Full disclosure: SocialMedia.org CEO Andy Sernovitz regularly contributes to this blog and serves as the editor at large for SmartBrief on Social Media.) With more than 50 consumer-facing brands, ConAgra’s social media strategy has to be approached in a specific, purposeful way that meets the needs of each individual consumer. What works to attract a base of Slim Jim fans may not necessarily translate to Healthy Choice buyers, Mazzeo said. Some aspects of ConAgra’s strategy include:
  • Shape content that’s specific to the audience in question. Mazzeo said ConAgra looks to the community to see what’s important to them. By understanding what exactly
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