Category Management

World Class Category Management for the consumer packaged goods sector. Category Management should always be concerned with asking, "What are your distribution experts delivering?" [caption id="attachment_1983" align="alignright" width="300"] category management[/caption] Consider how ‘one-off’ savings initiatives do not address systemic root cause issues when dealing with total cost of ownership challenges. Your...

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="190" caption="Image via Wikipedia"][/caption] Today, with companies seeking green or sustainability type initiatives, there are tremendous opportunities to implement waste stream optimization strategies in the company’s supply chain, field, and corporate front office (plastic and paper recycle bins), as well as back office...

In its infancy, advertising was an interruption. Ads were part of the price of watching TV or flipping through a magazine. More recently, brands have experimented with ways to make their messages desirable in their own right, via social engagement and branded content. But at a Social Media Week event at the Time-Life Building in New York City this month, Gabe Zichermann argued that in the future, brands will use game mechanics to go beyond just getting a customer’s attention. Instead, they will make themselves a part of the rhythm of their customers’ lives. Games are “a process, not a destination,” Zichermann argued. Zichermann said he defines “gamification” as the use of game mechanics and game-based thinking to solve problems and create user engagement. But more broadly, he explains, a solid game-based marketing program is really just the final incarnation of the loyalty programs businesses have been using for almost 200 years. In the first phase of loyalty programs, customers were given free merchandise for buying a set amount of product. Think of those cards that promise you a free pizza after you buy nine pizzas at the regular price. These are still the most common form of loyalty program, he says, but they’re not the most effective. They tend to offer incentives

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This post was written by SmartBrief’s Elizabeth Collins. The pharmaceutical companies that say they are waiting for the Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidance on how to handle drug promotion through social media are just using the FDA’s guidance delay as an “out,” or an excuse, said Glenn Byrd, MedImmune’s director of regulatory affairs, at the Marcus Evans “Social Media for Pharma” conference in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Some in the industry feel that when the FDA finally issues its social media guidance, answers to all their questions will suddenly become clear, he says. He doesn’t think that will be the case. He points to what we already know, however, which should be enough to get companies started. The FDA will regulate anything a pharmaceutical company does to generate interest in its products, and Byrd reminded the audience that the FDA has already made clear what its expectations are in regards to advertisements and promotions. “There’s already guidance

Image by jonny goldstein via Flickr This guest post is by Jeremy Epstein, founder and chief marketing navigator at Never Stop Marketing. If you found a pile of cash in your house, you would do something with it, right? Buy something. Invest it. Whatever. There...

Want to win a free ticket to the largest online blogging event of the year? Social Media Examiner, BlogWorld and SmartBrief on Social Media have partnered to bring you Blogging Success Summit 2011. And we’ve come up with a fun way to get you involved. First, what is this event? Blogging Success Summit 2011 is a large month-long online conference dedicated to help businesses master blogging. More than 500 marketers